Only propagandists believe settled science

first_imgMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists On Sept. 15, David Gillikin, Ph.D., suggested that we keep politics out of climate science, since the science is clear and effectively all scientists agree and that the science is settled.Really? Anyone with any common sense knows that science is never settled. Einstein proved that in 1905 with his Theory of Relativity, which upended a 200-year-old Theory of Mechanics created by Isaac Newton.I’m not a global warming believer or a global warming denier. However, I do believe that those scientists who pretend to know what this will cause in 20, 30 or 50 years are white-coated propagandists. Scientists have a very difficult time predicting weather, let alone climate. Witness the recent computer model predictions of the paths of Harvey, Irma and Maria. These computer models could not predict a week in advance, let alone decades. There is nothing more anti-scientific than the very idea that science is settled, static and impervious to challenge.If climate science is settled, why do its predictions keep changing? Why does a great physicist like Freeman Dyson say: “The models solve the equations of fluid dynamics, and they do a very good job of describing the fluid motions of the atmosphere and the oceans.“They do a very poor job of describing the clouds, the dust, the chemistry and the biology of fields and farms and forests. They do not begin to describe the real world we live in …” and, “What has happened in the past 10 years is that the discrepancies between what’s observed and what’s predicted have become much stronger. It’s clear now the models are wrong, but it wasn’t so clear 10 years ago.”Climate-change proponents have made their cause a matter of faith. For a geologist who supposedly is the brave carrier of the scientific ethic, there’s more than a tinge of religion in his tirade.Bob LindingerGuilderlandcenter_img Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Show more respect for president, law

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Hats off to all the writers with common sense who have something of value to write about: Dave Edwards, Joanne Clough and many others, even those with pro-death penalty remarks, with solid stats to back them up. I guess you could say I’m referring to same old tired song and dance about President Trump on this matter or that. It’s boring. Never in my lifetime have I witnessed a society fall so low, disrespectful of the president and law enforcement. Let me ask all you Trump haters this: Have any of you seen evidence up close and personally know for sure, 100 percent, he’s a racist, hurting you, or done you harm?  If all you can do is write about how much you hate someone, I pity you. Get a life, be thankful you are alive and enjoy everyday like it’s your last.Al Marvell Scotia More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

Respecting the office easier than its holder

first_imgWith reference to the Feb. 17 letter, “Respect the office of the president”: While there was much that I (and I suspect a good many others) disagree with, one statement was spot on: “Respect the office that he holds.” It’s quite possible to hold respect for something inanimate. As for the animate, they need to earn respect.Scott KilbournScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img

Letters to the Editor for Friday, Jan. 11

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionUse the shutdown savings to fund wallI read that about 800,000 government contractors are going unpaid due to the government shutdown. Assuming an average annual wage of $78,000 and figuring they have been out of work for three weeks, the government has so far saved $3.6 billion.Somebody should tell Trump that more than half the money is now available for his wall.Actually he could improve his design, or also put a wall up towards Canada, or make real KZ trailers for immigrants. The longer he waits, the more money he saves. Perhaps he will tell us that already.Bernd WestphalClifton Park Wood cutter needs more safety gearIt was nice to see a photo in the Jan. 9 Daily Gazette of a young man, Jake Armlin, sawing up some firewood, but this person should be aware of the dangers that he’s subjecting himself to. He‘s standing on top of logs while cutting up wood, which is not a very safe practice. He also doesn’t have on any protective eye-wear or hearing protectors. Additionally, he doesn’t have more protective leg-wear than a pair of jeans. If he wants to continue cutting up his firewood, he should really consider doing this while following safer practices.Rit SzczepanskiNorthville Build foot bridge to Scotia from StockadeAmsterdam has a lovely pedestrian bridge that spans the Mohawk River connecting south Amsterdam to north Amsterdam. The bridge has plaques of the local history, plus a few built-in benches and gardens that line the sides of the span.center_img The people of Amsterdam have made this bridge a local focal point for special occasions, a gathering place for celebrations and remembrances.Schenectady should have a pedestrian bridge. I’ve got a good suggestion for its location: the bottom of Washington Avenue in the Stockade.The bridge should span the river to the Scotia side at the intersection of Schonowee and Washington avenues. There are abutments still visible on both sides from the original bridge that crossed at this exact location. This bridge was built in 1806, and over the years was made into a covered bridge. It also accommodated the train tracks for the FJ&G railroad. Upon completion of the Great Western Gateway Bridge in 1925, the old bridge was demolished. A perfect location, as it’s the site of the first Schenectady settlement in 1661.Schenectady should have celebrated its 350th birthday in 2011. If there were any celebrations, I didn’t hear of them.Our 360th birthday is coming up in 2021. Let’s celebrate big time.  Let’s build a walking bridge that connects us to Scotia. We share so much of our history. It was Johannes Glen of Scotia, in 1691 when the Schenectady Massacre took place, who negotiated with the Indians and rescued many of our original settlers. Here’s hoping we can get this done.Winnie BalzSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Friday, March 15

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionNo sense to Background Check ActThe Bipartisan Background Check Act (HR8), when properly spun, sounds like a commonsense law to keep guns out of the hands of felons. A desirable goal, although there are currently many laws designed to do that. Let’s look a little closer at this law and its results.As a child I received several guns from my now deceased uncle. If I return them to my cousins, I would be a felon, as I did not first do a background check. If I lent a friend a rifle to hunt with, that constitutes an illegal transfer, again I am a felon. If I let a friend handle or shoot my gun while target shooting, that also is an illegal transfer, another felony. Think about that, letting another person handle your firearm, unless you are on the premises of a Federal Firearm Dealer, will make you a felon, subject to a year in jail and $100,000 fine. Farmers and ranchers who hand (transfer) an employee a gun to deal with predators or injured livestock would become felons. Accepting a gun from a suicidal friend would make you a felon.It quickly becomes evident that there is no commonsense to this law, it is just another scheme to criminalize legitimate gun owners. Which, come to think of it, is probably the end goal of this law’s writers.James Van DijkSaratoga SpringsNational Grid’s lights flickeringI’m writing this letter to vent my frustration with National Grid. This is a huge company that we all depend on. On the afternoon of March 10, my daughter called me in distress saying that her lights were flashing on and off in rapid succession.She said it was scary. She has limited cell coverage and was not sure how long her phone would work. I called the main number provided by National Grid.After two minutes of commercials, I was told to choose option seven which was a gas leak or a life threatening emergency. Since this did not fit in that scenario, I chose the next option non-life threatening. I was on hold for more than 20 minutes, gave up and went for option seven. The woman that answered had an attitude, stated that the power was out in my daughter’s area and would be restored later in the evening was about to hang up on me when I asked her if they should unplug their appliances, she said with her attitude, if it were me I would. And then hung up. This was not an emergency per se, sitting on hold for over 20 minutes listening to what a great company National Grid is was an unpleasant surprise. I hope if I have a real emergency, someone will answer the phone promptly. Most of the workers at National Grid are hard dedicated workers, and I appreciate all that they do. They just need to work on their communication skills.Marty ShantyCharltonAbortion is extremely racistLiberals love to tell us that they are pro-abortion and anti-racist. To anyone who knows much of anything about history, this is a contradiction of terms. History shows that Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, was about as racist as anyone could possibly be. Margaret was a eugenicist, who created slogans like: “More children from the fit, less from the unfit – that is the chief aim of birth control,” and “Birth Control: to create a race of thoroughbreds.”A director of the American Birth Control League, Sanger’s organization prior to Planned Parenthood, expressed his admiration for the Nazis’ method of cleaning up their race problems by sterilizing those who were unfit to produce children. There was little distinction made between eugenic and Nazi goals.Adolph Hitler used birth control for the same purposes, making it and abortion illegal for Aryans, while at the same time spreading propaganda in territories outside Germany that billed abortion as safe and childbirth as a health hazard.A graph produced by the Guttmacher Institute in 2017 shows that abortion rates by race changed from 40 percent for blacks, 27 percent for Hispanics, 10 percent for whites, and 23 percent other in 2000, to 38, 25, 14 and 23 respectively in 2014, while the total number of abortions decreased 42 percent. Fewer babies being killed overall, but still disproportionately more black and Hispanic babies than white babies. Abortion is extremely racist. Seems Sanger’s objective and that of the far left, of reducing the non-white population, is succeeding.James HomanGlenville More from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Cuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccineEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Thursday, Aug. 22

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionEndangered Species Act must not be cutI’m writing in support of the Endangered Species Act, and in opposition to efforts by some in Congress and Interior Secretary Bernhardt to weaken it.As a scientist, I’m concerned about the loss of plants, fish and animals because we need to save as much of our biodiversity as possible if ecological systems on which we depend are to survive. Protecting and saving species is essential to ensure that future generations experience the world as we do now. The Endangered Species Act is a safety net for living things with which we share this planet.Since President Nixon signed the law in 1973, hundreds of species, including the bald eagle and whooping crane, have been saved from disappearing forever, and many more are on their way to recovery. In New York, the Endangered Species Act protects the roseate tern, bog turtle and other plants and animals from extinction.But today, some members of Congress and the administration are attacking the Endangered Species Act to benefit developers and the oil-and-gas and mining industries. Their proposed policies have no scientific basis and would make it harder to protect important habitat for imperiled wildlife. I hope and expect that Sens. Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand will vigorously defend the Endangered Species Act.We have a responsibility to future generations to be good stewards of the natural world and protect endangered species and the special places they call home.Wally EltonSaratoga SpringsCharter change will be good for citizens  Thank you for calling attention to the citizens’ initiative for charter reform in Saratoga Springs in the Aug. 11 Sunday Gazette.Our petition effort is demonstrating the growing support for reform here, where an antique form of government has contributed to chronic unsolved problems, self-dealing among elected officials and an inability for democratic norms to provide accountability at the ballot box. From 2016-17, I served on the mayoral appointed commission that proposed a City Council to set budgets and policy, with a professional manager to bring order to the executive functions that are now divided among five “stovepipes” each headed by a different elected politician.The most striking finding we discovered, from a rigorous survey of the city workforce, was that employees were spending 30% – 50% of their time navigating the stovepipes. Confusion and impediments are not the sole experience of everyday taxpayers; even the professionals are stymied by the current form of government. That proposal came only 10 votes short of passing, out of more than 9,000 cast. In Saratoga Springs, we are ready for this change.In the coming 15 months, we will educate and advocate, aiming for wide participation in a November 2020 referendum.The new proposal features professional, unified management, mayoral leadership, and six City Council wards, so that each of the city’s neighborhoods will feel engaged with the democratic norms of representation and accountability, instead of feeling left out.That can only be good for our neighborhoods and for the taxpayer.Gordon BoydSaratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

Retail

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Grosvenor branches out with two new joint ventures

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British Land swoops on Tricorn redevelopment

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Regional outlook: Midlands still overcast

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