Unrest grows in crisis-hit Lebanon amid coronavirus lockdown

first_imgTRIPOLI, Lebanon (AP) — Lebanese security forces have fired more volleys of tear gas at rock-throwing youth in the northern city of Tripoli amid outrage over the country’s coronavirus lockdown and the government’s inaction in the face of growing poverty. The violence in Tripoli, Lebanon’s second largest city and the most impoverished, marked a serious escalation in protests that began on Monday and continued for three straight days into Wednesday night. Dozens of young men have been taking part in the nightly protests throwing rocks at security forces and in some cases torching vehicles. The violence has left a 30-year-old man dead and more than 220 people injured.last_img

Officer who died after DC riot to lie in honor in Capitol

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick, who died at the hands of the mob that besieged the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, will lie in honor in the building’s Rotunda. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer released a joint statement Friday saying, ”His sacrifice reminds us every day of our obligation to our country and to the people we serve.” Congress will hold a ceremonial arrival for the 42-year-old Sicknick on Tuesday night, after which a viewing period will be held overnight for members of the Capitol Police. Lawmakers will pay tribute Wednesday morning before a ceremonial departure for Arlington National Cemetery, where Sicknick will be interred.last_img

Poland plans to speed up move to clean and nuclear energy

first_imgWARSAW, Poland (AP) — Poland’s government has adopted a plan to speed up the coal-reliant nation’s transformation to clean and nuclear energy. The Cabinet passed a resolution Tuesday that calls for Poland to obtain 23% of its energy from renewable sources by 2030, compared to some 13% now. The plan foresees an increase in wind energy, especially from farms on the Baltic Sea, and the opening of Poland’s first nuclear power plant in 2033. The move toward a zero-emissions energy policy is expected to produce some 300,000 jobs, according to the resolution released by Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki’s office.last_img

Michigan Republican defends impeachment vote to upset voters

first_imgLANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Rep. Peter Meijer has defended his decision to impeach former President Donald Trump amid criticism from voters. Meijer, a freshman lawmaker, was one of just 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump over the deadly attack on the Capitol. He said during a virtual town hall Wednesday night that Trump’s falsehoods and the resulting insurrection required a “significant response” from Congress. Two constituents who asked questions said they were deeply disappointed with the 33-year-old, who represents the 3rd Congressional District in western Michigan. One accused Meijer of betrayal and said she would work to defeat him in the 2022 primary.last_img

Kansas measure would criminalize care for transgender youth

first_imgTOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas legislation that would make it a felony for doctors to provide medical treatments that help transgender youth transition is unlikely to get a hearing. The proposal from four conservative GOP members of the Kansas House has drawn condemnation from LGBTQ lawmakers and advocates. It is among measures in more than a dozen state legislatures targeting transgender youth in sports or medical treatments for them. Republican House health committee Chair Brenda Landwehr said Thursday that the measure probably will not have a hearing because the panel has too much other work, such as proposals for modernizing the state’s mental health system.last_img

Iditarod drops ceremonial start over crowd-size concerns

first_imgANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — There is another dramatic change for the Iditarod this year. Officials on Friday announced that the cfan-favorite ceremonial start for the world’s most famous sled dog race has been canceled over crowd-size concerns during the pandemic. The event usually draws large crowds to downtown Anchorage, where beer and food tents line city streets. Iditarod CEO Rob Urbach says they take the health and well-being of the racers, volunteers, staff and spectators very seriously. The race has been shortened this year, and it will start and finish north of Anchorage instead of having the finish line in Nome. There will be limited areas for spectators for the race’s start and end, and fans are encouraged to watch on television.last_img