Turfgrass 101

first_imgThese grasses include annual rye, poa trivialis, creepingbentgrass, tall fescue and perennial rye.For more research-based information on turfgrass, visit www.georgiaturf.com orcontact your local UGA Cooperative Extension agent at1-800-ASK-UGA1.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) Prefer warm to hot temperatures (80 to 95 degrees).Grow best in summer.Have extended winter dormancy.Have poor shade and winter tolerance. These types of grass include bermudagrass, St. Augustinegrass,centipedegrass, zoysiagrass and seashore paspalum.Cool-season grasses grow well during the cool months of springand fall when temperatures average 60-75 degrees. They mayundergo stress, become dormant or be injured during the hotmonths of summer and may require significantly more water thanthe warm-season grasses.Cool-season grasses: Prefer cool to warm temperatures (65 to 75 degrees).Grow best in the spring and fall.Have limited winter dormancy.Have good winter tolerance and adequate shade tolerance. By Stephanie SchupskaUniversity ofGeorgiaGeorgia’s plant hardiness zones cover a wide range, from thebalmy climate of Savannah to the exhausting heat of Valdosta tothe frigid temperatures of Blairsville. Because of Georgia’sclimate extremes, a grass like St. Augustinegrass that growsgreat in Tifton will have trouble surviving in Rome.University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts have takenthe guesswork out of picking a good grass for your lawn. Use theguide below as you head to the lawn and garden store or beforeyou call a sod company.Warm-season grasses grow best during the warm months whentemperatures reach 80-95 degrees in the spring, summer and earlyfall. They grow vigorously during this time and become brown anddormant in the winter.Warm-season grasses:last_img

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *