Seaspan contracts L3 MAPPS for Canadian JSS deliveries

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Seaspan contracts L3 MAPPS for Canadian JSS deliveries Share this article Seaspan contracts L3 MAPPS for Canadian JSS deliveries View post tag: Seaspan View post tag: L3 MAPPS Canadian shipbuilder Seaspan Shipyards announced it has awarded L3 MAPPS a contract for work on the Royal Canadian Navy’s new Joint Support Ships (JSS).Based in Montreal, L3 MAPPS will provide the integrated platform management system (IPMS) for JSS.The IPMS will control and monitor platform machinery and systems on board JSS, including advanced functionality, such as the battle damage control system, onboard training system, equipment health monitoring and other new IPMS capabilities.L3 MAPPS has a long-standing relationship with the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) spanning over 35 years. The company plays a major role as a Tier 1 supplier in the Halifax-class frigate upgrade program.The award is one of several to be announced for Canadian suppliers supporting Seaspan’s work on naval supply ships under the NSS.“We are pleased to be awarded the contract to deliver the Integrated Platform Management System (IPMS) for the Royal Canadian Navy’s new Joint Support Ships currently under construction at Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards. L3 MAPPS’ technology will enhance the operational effectiveness of JSS and make it a safer vessel for its crew, other RCN sailors, and the environment,” Rangesh Kasturi, President, L3 MAPPS commented.Construction on the JSS started with a steel-cutting ceremony at Seaspan’s Vancouver shipyard in June last year.The JSS will be replenishment ships crewed by 240 sailors whose task will be to ensure surface combatant vessels can stay at sea longer. The two JSS will replace the former Auxiliary Oiler Replenishment vessels.The construction start of the JSS in June 2018 will result in the first JSS being delivered in 2022/23, and the second in 2023/24. Equipment & technology View post tag: JSS navaltoday View post tag: Royal Canadian Navy January 18, 2019, bylast_img read more

Strong showing for musicals with A.R.T. ties

first_imgTwo Broadway shows with origins at the American Repertory Theater (A.R.T.) cleaned up at the Tony Awards on Sunday night. “The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess” and “Once” took home 10 awards in total, including the prizes for best musical revival and best musical, respectively.“This was an extraordinary night for the A.R.T. and for the activity of the arts at Harvard,” said Diane Paulus, the theater’s artistic director, who developed and directed the “Porgy” adaptation last fall in the lead-up to its Broadway debut in January.“Porgy,” which was nominated in 10 categories, also scored a best actress award for Audra McDonald’s wrenching performance as Bess in the classic American opera. “Once” — which was developed at the A.R.T. last year by John Tiffany, a 2010-11 fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study — took home a whopping eight awards of the 11 for which it was nominated, including best direction for Tiffany and best sound design of a musical for Clive Goodwin, resident sound designer and engineer at the A.R.T.The awards were an affirmation of the A.R.T.’s work and “the kind of dialogue we provoke,” Paulus said, perhaps both in spite of and because of the experimental theater’s distance from Broadway. The adaptation of “Porgy” was “so informed by our relationship with Harvard — everything from the course I taught with Professor Marjorie Garber to the Harvard student interns who worked all summer on the show when we were mounting it in Cambridge,” Paulus said. “This recognition is just a great moment for the A.R.T. and for Harvard and for the Boston audience.”Indeed, “Porgy” producer Jeffrey Richards gave a shout-out to the adaptation’s Cambridge roots in his acceptance speech for best musical revival.“We want to thank the Gershwin estates, who gave permission for us to do this show and permission to bring ‘Porgy and Bess’ into the 21st century,” Richards said. “We did that because of a visionary director, Diane Paulus, who gave us a great home to incubate this show at the American Repertory Theater — that’s A.R.T., at Harvard.”The opera beat a revival of Stephen Sondheim’s “Follies” for the award, an ironic touch given Sondheim’s early criticism of the A.R.T.’s adaptation of “Porgy and Bess” (which, though he had not yet seen it, he dubbed too radical). Paulus insisted she didn’t dwell on the competition.“Being nominated is the greatest honor, and part of that honor is the company you’re in,” said Paulus, who was also nominated for best direction of a musical alongside her colleague, Tiffany. “When we won [for best] revival, it was just an emotional relief for the production and an amazing moment for our story.”“Once,” Tiffany’s directorial debut on Broadway, was another against-the-odds success at the awards. The show is based on a low-budget 2006 Irish film. Though its quiet story of two musicians’ romance made it an Academy Award-winning fan favorite, it wasn’t exactly obvious material for a big-budget Broadway production.But the play, which workshopped at the A.R.T. last fall, won more Tony Awards than any other this year, including prizes for best actor in a musical (Steve Kazee), best scenic design of a musical (Bob Crowley), best book of a musical (Enda Walsh), best orchestration of a musical (Martin Lowe), and best lighting design of a musical (Natasha Katz).The production also provided a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for Goodwin, who took on his routine sound duties at the A.R.T. for “Once” during its unannounced two-week run at Oberon.“I loved the show so much, and they liked me enough to want to keep me on and take me with them to the next stages,” said Goodwin, who had never before worked on Broadway. Tiffany was receptive to Goodwin’s ideas for a production that looked and sounded “as natural as possible,” with carefully hidden headset mics and speakers.“He steers everybody so gently, so beautifully, that it gets the best out of people without any difficulties, without any stress,” Goodwin said of the director. “The show is something to be proud of, and I’m immensely proud of my small part in it.”Tiffany (along with some members of his Tony-winning design team) will return to the A.R.T. next season to helm Tennessee Williams’ classic drama “The Glass Menagerie,” which opens next Feb. 2. Though the British director was already known for his work with the experimental National Theatre of Scotland, Paulus admits she was lucky to lure him to Harvard before “Once” put his name in lights.“We were talking pretty early on about what John might want to do if he came back” to the A.R.T., Paulus said. “I asked him, ‘What’s your dream project?’ and he said ‘Glass Menagerie,’ and I said, ‘Let’s do it.’ It’s exciting to have an artist of his caliber coming back next year.”last_img read more

Local foundation takes unique approach to funding family-related agencies

first_imgNapoleon, In. — In a very unique fashion, the Ripley County Community Foundation awarded three grants to agencies that work to improve the lives of families and children in the county. Phi Beta Psi XI Chapter received a $1,500 grant, Samaritan’s Hope Chest was awarded a $1,000 grant and the Batesville Memorial Public Library receives a $500 grant.Executive director Amy Streator says attendees at the “Queen of Hearts” luncheon at the St. Maurice Hall in Napoleon decided which organizations got the grants.Allowing participants make funding decisions allows donors to be closer to the ward process.last_img

Students participate in AIDS Walk Los Angeles

first_imgFollow us on Twitter @dailytrojan USC students participated in the annual AIDS Walk Los Angeles in West Hollywood on Sunday.The walk, in which about 30,000 people participated, was organized by AIDS Project Los Angeles, a group that hopes to improve the lives of those fighting HIV/AIDS while raising awareness through various events.USC’s Undergraduate Student Government’s Community Affairs Committee organized transportation for students to participate in Sunday’s AIDS Walk Los Angeles in West Hollywood.“We’re not specifically endorsing the walk, we’re just providing transportation for USC members in a safe way. We’ve been doing it every year so it has just become tradition to do it,” said Kandace London, USG’s director of community affairs. “We provided transportation by offering two to three buses all paid for by Undergraduate Student Government.”USG began offering this service after they learned that every year numerous USC students wanted to attend the walk but were unable to make it because of a lack of transportation. Since then, they said they have tried to accommodate student needs.“We made it our mission to make sure that anyone who wanted to participate in it would have a free way to get there,” London said.Students said they took advantage of USG’s services for various reasons. Levi Powell, a junior majoring in dental hygiene, participated because he believed this event would bring  his fraternity together, while also helping a good cause.“I chose to attend this event for two reasons, in support of my fraternity and to spend my time on something worthwhile,” said powell. “It’s the start of our ‘Kappa Week’ at my fraternity [Kappa Alpha Psi], where we do different events everyday throughout the week.”Powell’s fraternity brother, Bryen Irving agreed with him.“Our fraternity feels it’s important to reach out to the community. I’ve heard about the walk because I’m from L.A.,” said Irving, a junior majoring in mechanical engineering. “It was powerful to see this many people turn out for a cause like this, and this isn’t a one-time thing because they are bringing people out like this every year.”Other students were excited to spend time with different groups from outside of the USC community.“I had never experienced the coming together of such a diverse group. It was definitely eye-opening to see how such a big city could unite to help others,” said Riyana Chakraborty, a member of USG Community Affairs.Many celebrities also participated, including stars of the ABC television show, Revenge, and famous personalities such as Richard Simmons. Hundreds of people gathered for the opening ceremonies as these stars spoke about how AIDS has affected them and the importance of acceptance.Numerous companies also donated their products to encourage the walkers. Companies such as Evolution Fresh and Gatorade donated millions of bottles of their products to be passed along to participants as they made their way toward the finish line.USG Community Affairs member Evelyn Lee appreciated the hundreds of volunteers who gathered along the path handing out snacks, fresh fruit and drinks.“I think it was really encouraging to have people not only constantly keeping you hydrated, but also cheering for the entire path to the finish line,” Lee said. “They stood along the sidelines giving high-fives and telling people to drink water and stay healthy.”Students who participated in the walk said they were happy to see such a diverse group come together for a cause.“It surprised me how much people care for one another,” Chakraborty said. “I am proud to live in a place like Los Angeles where people are accepting and the opportunities for change are so limitless.”last_img read more